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Endocrine Treatment of Transsexual Persons – A Patient’s Guide

In 1923, the term transsexual was first used to describe persons who felt profound discomfort with their biological sex. Today, medical treatment, sometimes together with surgery, allows transsexual persons to make a male-to-female (MTF) or female-to-male (FTM) transition and to live a gender-appropriate life.

This is the patient guide that was released at the same time as the “Endocrine Treatment
of Transsexual Persons”.

Dated September 2009.

Endocrine-Treatment-of-Transsexual-Persons
Endocrine-Treatment-of-Transsexual-Persons
Endocrine-Treatment-of-Transsexual-Persons.pdf
340.2 KiB
301 Downloads
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Endocrine Treatment of Transsexual Persons

The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for endocrine treatment of transsexual persons by medical practitioners, endocrinologists, surgeons, psychiatrists, and General Practitioners. This is the current version even though it is dated 2009.

First published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, September 2009, 94(9): 3132–3154

Endocrine Treatment Ts
Endocrine Treatment Ts
endocrine_treatment_ts.pdf
215.4 KiB
287 Downloads
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Its been a long time in the research and writing, but finally its here. Here are some factoids about it –

337 pages, 16 chapters, 2 appendices, 4 indexes, 1 bibliography, 1 glossary, 26 figures, 52 tables, 255 citations.

It has chapters on – endocrinology, human anatomy, herbal hormones, hormones, DHT-blockers, anti-androgens, progestogens, other useful drugs, discontinued drugs, endogenous hormones, potential problems, clinical biochemistry, general discussion.

Dated 7 March 2015.

UniversalHormones2015
UniversalHormones2015
UniversalHormones2015-v1.0.pdf
Version: 1.0
2.8 MiB
177 Downloads
Details


Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Sex Change – But Were Afraid To Ask

by Melanie. Written by an American but contains interesting information, some of which may be out of date now.

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know ...
521.5 KiB
647 Downloads
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Endocrinology Handbook, May 2010 – NEW

The most current update of the “Endocrinology Handbook”  published by the Imperial College Endocrine Unit, London.

Bible2010v1b
Bible2010v1b
Bible2010v1b.pdf
289.1 KiB
152 Downloads
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A Guide To Hormone Therapy For Trans People

This booklet has been produced by a team that includes doctors and trans people to help you understand and answer some of your questions about hormone treatment for trans people. If you are thinking about starting hormone therapy, you may find it helpful to share the information in this booklet with a spouse or partner or other family members. Department of Health guidelines dated 2007.

Doh-hormone-therapy
Doh-hormone-therapy
doh-hormone-therapy.pdf
183.4 KiB
196 Downloads
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Guidance For GPs, Other Clinicians And Health Professionals On The Care Of Gender Variant People

Gender variant people are relatively rarely seen in GP surgeries. Many GPs say that they lack the knowledge to treat those experiencing gender variant conditions and, consequently, they are not confident to do so. The first part of this publication provides an overview of care for trans people that is particularly applicable to GPs. Department of Health guidelines dated 2008.

Doh-guidelines-for-clinicians
Doh-guidelines-for-clinicians
doh-guidelines-for-clinicians.pdf
314.8 KiB
224 Downloads
Details


NHS Funding Processes And Waiting Times For Adult Service-Users

This publication will help you understand the processes involved in obtaining funding for treatment for gender variant conditions. It answers the questions that service-users typically ask, and it provides guidance on how to navigate this complex system with minimum delay. Your GP may also find this information helpful. Department of Health guidelines dated 2008.

Doh-nhs-funding-processes
Doh-nhs-funding-processes
doh-nhs-funding-processes.pdf
120.8 KiB
164 Downloads
Details


Standards Of Care For The Health Of Transsexual, Transgender, And Gender Nonconforming People – Version 7

This is the current version as used by the ‘The World Professional Association for Transgender Health’.

SOCv7
SOCv7
SOCv7.pdf
1.7 MiB
181 Downloads
Details


Nursing With Dignity

A guide to cultural and spiritual awareness, from various sources. This is Version 2 which is much improved.

Dignityv2
Dignityv2
dignityv2.pdf
339.0 KiB
242 Downloads
Details


Counselling Transgendered, Transsexual, And Gender-Variant Clients

A guide for counsellors from Journal of Counselling & Development 2002.

Lynne-Carroll-Paula-J -Gilroy-Jo-Ryan-Counseling-Transgendered-Transsexual-and-Gender-Variant-Clients
Lynne-Carroll-Paula-J -Gilroy-Jo-Ryan-Counseling-Transgendered-Transsexual-and-Gender-Variant-Clients
Lynne-Carroll-Paula-J.-Gilroy-Jo-Ryan-Counseling-Transgendered-Transsexual-and-Gender-Variant-Clients.pdf
187.8 KiB
201 Downloads
Details


Clinical Conditions-v1.7

A guide to various different clinical conditions showing their signs and symptoms, and their treatment options.

Clinical
Clinical
clinical-v1.7.pdf
Version: 1.7
933.8 KiB
882 Downloads
Details


UPDATED 11 December 2014

This is a radio programme first broadcast on BBC Three Counties Radio round about the end of June 2014.

Shrink Wrapped - Gender Dysphoria P021gfbc Default
Shrink Wrapped - Gender Dysphoria P021gfbc Default
Shrink_Wrapped_-_Gender_Dysphoria_p021gfbc_default.mp3
33.7 MiB
255 Downloads
Details

A radio programme broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on 12 December 2014.

A revealing series which goes inside the Charing Cross Gender Identity Clinic in Hammersmith, London – the largest and oldest in the world – to explore the condition of gender dysphoria. This programme discusses trans-men.

Becoming Myself---2014-12-12
Becoming Myself---2014-12-12
Becoming_Myself---2014-12-12.mp3
26.6 MiB
243 Downloads
Details

A radio programme broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on 19 December 2014.

The second in a two-part series, with this one covering trans-women.

Becoming Myself---2014-12-19
Becoming Myself---2014-12-19
Becoming_Myself---2014-12-19.mp3
26.6 MiB
124 Downloads
Details

 

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How to evaluate health information on the internet

Sharon says – I have included a comment of mine in this text, and it is in italics to make it easier for you to recognise it, like this one!

Millions of people are using the internet to get health information. And thousands of websites are offering health information. Some of those sites are reliable and up-to-date; some are not. How can you tell the good from the bad?

First, it’s important to carefully consider the source of information and then to discuss the information you find with your health care professional. These questions and answers can help you determine whether the health information you find on the internet or receive by email from a website is likely to be reliable.

Evaluating internet health information

Who runs the website?

Any good health website should make it easy to learn who is responsible for the site and its information. On the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) website, for example, the FDA is clearly noted on every major page, along with a link to the site’s home (main) page, www.fda.gov .

Information about who runs the site can often be found in an “About Us” or “About this website” section, and there’s usually a link to that section on the site’s home page.

What is the purpose of the website?

Is the purpose of the site to inform? Is it to sell a product? Is it to raise money? If you can tell who runs and pays for the site, this will help you evaluate its purpose. Be cautious about sites trying to sell a product or service.

Quackery abounds on the web. Look for these warning signs and remember the adage “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.”

  • Does the site promise quick, dramatic, miraculous results? Is this the only site making these claims?
  • Beware of claims that one remedy will cure a variety of illnesses, that it is a “breakthrough”, or that it relies on a “secret ingredient”.
  • Use caution if the site uses a sensational writing style (lots of exclamation marks, for example.)
  • A health website for consumers should use simple language, not technical jargon. Get a second opinion. Check more than one site.
  • If a health website does use technical jargon, i.e. medical or nursing jargon, it should explain simply what it means

What is the original source of the information on the website?

Always pay close attention to where the information on the site comes from. Many health and medical websites post information collected from other websites or sources. If the person or organization in charge of the site did not write the material, the original source should be clearly identified. Be careful of sites that don’t say where the information comes from.

Good sources of health information include –

  • Sites that end in “.gov”, sponsored by the federal government, like the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services www.hhs.gov, the FDA www.fda.gov, the National Institutes of Health www.nih.gov, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov, and the National Library of Medicine www.nlm.nih.gov.
  • .edu sites, which are run by universities or medical schools, such as Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the University of California at Berkeley Hospital, health system, and other health care facility sites, like the Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic.
  • .org sites maintained by not-for-profit groups whose focus is research and teaching the public about specific diseases or conditions, such as the American Diabetes Association, the American Cancer Society, and the American Heart Association.
  • Medical and scientific journals, such as The New England Journal of Medicine and the Journal of the American Medical Association, although these aren’t written for consumers and could be hard to understand.
  • Sites whose addresses end in .com are usually commercial sites and are often selling products.

How is the information on the website documented?

In addition to identifying the original source of the material, the site should identify the evidence on which the material is based. Medical facts and figures should have references (such as citations of articles in medical journals). Also, opinions or advice should be clearly set apart from information that is “evidence-based” (that is, based on research results).

How is information reviewed before it is posted on the website?

Health-related websites should give information about the medical credentials of the people who prepare or review the material on the website.

How current is the information on the website?

Websites should be reviewed and updated on a regular basis. It is particularly important that medical information be current, and that the most recent update or review date be clearly posted. These dates are usually found at the bottom of the page. Even if the information has not changed, it is helpful to know that the site owners have reviewed it recently to ensure that the information is still valid. Click on a few links on the site. If there are a lot of broken links, the site may not be kept up-to-date.

How does the website choose links to other sites?

Reliable websites usually have a policy about how they establish links to other sites. Some medical websites take a conservative approach and do not link to any other sites; some link to any site that asks or pays for a link; others link only to sites that have met certain criteria. Look for the website’s linking policy, often found in a section titled “About This Web Site”.

What information about its visitors does the website collect, and why?

Websites routinely track the path visitors take through their sites to determine what pages are being used. However, many health-related websites ask the visitor to “subscribe” or “become a member”. In some cases, this may be done so they can collect a fee or select relevant information for the visitor. In all cases, the subscription or membership will allow the website owners to collect personal information about their visitors.

Many commercial sites sell “aggregate” data about their visitors to other companies – what percent are women with breast cancer, for example. In some cases, they may collect and reuse information that is personally identifiable, such as a visitor’s ZIP code, gender, and birth date.

Any website asking users for personal information should explain exactly what the site will and will not do with the information. The FDA website, for example, spells this out in its Privacy Statement. Be sure to read and understand any privacy policy or similar language on the site, and don’t sign up for anything you don’t fully understand.

How does the website manage interactions with visitors?

There should always be a way for visitors to contact the website owners with problems, feedback, and questions. The FDA’s website provides contact information on its Contact Us page.

If the site hosts a chat room or other online discussion areas, it should tell its visitors about the terms of using the service. Is the service moderated? If so, by whom, and why? It is always a good idea to spend time reading the discussion without joining in, to feel comfortable with the environment, before becoming a participant.

Can the accuracy of information received in an email be verified?

Carefully evaluate email messages. Consider the origin of the message and its purpose. Some companies or organisations use email to advertise products or attract people to their websites. The accuracy of health information may be influenced by the desire to promote a product or service.

Is the information that’s discussed in chat rooms accurate?

Assessing the reliability of health information that you come across in web discussion groups or chat rooms is at least as important as it is for websites. Although these groups can sometimes provide good information about specific diseases or disorders, they can also perpetuate misinformation. Most internet service providers don’t verify what is discussed in these groups, and you have no way of knowing the qualifications or credentials of the other people online. Sometimes people use these groups to promote products without letting on that they have a financial stake in the business. It’s best to discuss anything you learn from these groups with your health care professional.

Related Resources

Healthfinder

A DHHS site that is a gateway to consumer information. Its goal is to improve consumer access to selected health information from government agencies, their partner organizations, and other reliable sources that serve the public interest.

MEDLINEplus

A consumer-oriented website established by the National Library of Medicine, the world’s largest biomedical library and creator of the MEDLINE database. It offers health, drug, and disease information.

MEDLINEplus Evaluating Health Information MEDLINEplus Healthy Websurfing

ClinicalTrials.gov

A site created by the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration to provide patients, family members, and members of the public with current information about clinical research studies and clinical trials.

A Quick Checklist

You can use the following checklist to help make sure that the health information you are reading online can be trusted.

  • [ ] Can you easily see who sponsors the website?
  • [ ] Is the sponsor a government agency, a medical school, or a reliable health-related organization, or is it related to one of these?
  • [ ] Is there contact information?
  • [ ] Can you tell when the information was written?
  • [ ] Is your privacy protected?
  • [ ] Does the website make claims that seem too good to be true? Are quick, miraculous cures promised?

How to Evaluate Health Information on the Internet 2005

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Universal Hormones 2015

Here it is, at long last. I hope you think its worth it.

Some factoids about it –

9 months in the writing, 337 pages, 16 chapters, 2 appendices, 4 indexes, 1 bibliography, 1 glossary, 26 figures, 52 tables, 255 citations.

It has chapters on – endocrinology, human anatomy, herbal hormones, hormones, DHT-blockers, anti-androgens, progestogens, other useful drugs, discontinued drugs, endogenous hormones, potential problems, clinical biochemistry, general discussion.

This now takes the place of the file “UK Hormones” and is very up-to-date.

UniversalHormones2015
UniversalHormones2015
UniversalHormones2015-v1.0.pdf
Version: 1.0
2.8 MiB
177 Downloads
Details
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Counselling

Counselling Transgendered, Transsexual, And Gender-Variant Clients

A guide for counsellors from Journal of Counselling & Development 2002.

Lynne-Carroll-Paula-J -Gilroy-Jo-Ryan-Counseling-Transgendered-Transsexual-and-Gender-Variant-Clients
Lynne-Carroll-Paula-J -Gilroy-Jo-Ryan-Counseling-Transgendered-Transsexual-and-Gender-Variant-Clients
Lynne-Carroll-Paula-J.-Gilroy-Jo-Ryan-Counseling-Transgendered-Transsexual-and-Gender-Variant-Clients.pdf
187.8 KiB
201 Downloads
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Nursing with Dignity

Nursing With Dignity

A guide to cultural and spiritual awareness, from various sources. This is Version 2 which is much improved.

Dignityv2
Dignityv2
dignityv2.pdf
339.0 KiB
242 Downloads
Details

 

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SOC – version 7

Standards Of Care For The Health Of Transsexual, Transgender, And Gender Nonconforming People – Version 7

This is the current version as used by the ‘The World Professional Association for Transgender Health’.

SOCv7
SOCv7
SOCv7.pdf
1.7 MiB
181 Downloads
Details

 

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Becoming Myself: Gender Identity – 2

A radio programme broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on 19 December 2014.

The second in a two-part series, with this one covering trans-women.

Becoming Myself---2014-12-19
Becoming Myself---2014-12-19
Becoming_Myself---2014-12-19.mp3
26.6 MiB
124 Downloads
Details
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Clinical Guidance

Guidance For GPs, Other Clinicians And Health Professionals On The Care Of Gender Variant People

Gender variant people are relatively rarely seen in GP surgeries. Many GPs say that they lack the knowledge to treat those experiencing gender variant conditions and, consequently, they are not confident to do so. The first part of this publication provides an overview of care for trans people that is particularly applicable to GPs. Department of Health guidelines dated 2008.

Doh-guidelines-for-clinicians
Doh-guidelines-for-clinicians
doh-guidelines-for-clinicians.pdf
314.8 KiB
224 Downloads
Details

 

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NHS Funding

NHS Funding Processes And Waiting Times For Adult Service-Users

This publication will help you understand the processes involved in obtaining funding for treatment for gender variant conditions. It answers the questions that service-users typically ask, and it provides guidance on how to navigate this complex system with minimum delay. Your GP may also find this information helpful. Department of Health guidelines dated 2008.

Doh-nhs-funding-processes
Doh-nhs-funding-processes
doh-nhs-funding-processes.pdf
120.8 KiB
164 Downloads
Details

 

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Becoming Myself: Gender Identity – 1

A radio programme broadcast on Radio 4 on 12 December 2014.  This is a mp3 file of 28MB size.

A revealing series which goes inside the Charing Cross Gender Identity Clinic in Hammersmith, London – the largest and oldest in the world – to explore the condition of gender dysphoria.

Becoming Myself---2014-12-12
Becoming Myself---2014-12-12
Becoming_Myself---2014-12-12.mp3
26.6 MiB
243 Downloads
Details

 

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